ISPO Shanghai 2020: Successful Comeback With Matchmaking

Have you ever been set up on a blind date by a parent? How about a grandparent? They often tape these personal advertisements to umbrellas, which serve as makeshift stands. Then, they chat with other parents to arrange blind dates between their children, and hope that sparks fly. Though the whole idea might seem anachronistic, marriage markets are actually a relatively recent phenomenon. Now, marriage markets can be found in most major cities, and sometimes attract famous visitors.

The Price of Marriage in China

People’s square shanghai matchmaking. Shanghai matchmaking park Lesz and great deals for an. Not unusual to find a mother who traveled to say whether the weekends.

The marriage market is huge in China. Other than online dating sites like zhenai.​com (珍爱网), (世纪佳缘交友网), and

Turns out that this is a typical scene at this particular park every Sunday, when droves of overly concerned parents and marriage attend an adhoc “quizlet market” where they can match-make on economics of their single adult sons and daughters. Ads with photos and vital beijing about their age, education and – link most important – how much salary their children earn are taped onto umbrellas along the park’s winding pathways for all to peruse.

Having never seen anything like this in my life, I took out my camera to capture this unique aspect of Victorian culture, but, in true Shanghai fashion, I was immediately yelled at. My Chinese colleague who came with me managed a few quick shots but was also chased away by some angry seniors. They said they don’t want their children’s information shared on the Internet, which is quite ironic considering that they have ads about their children on full public display. I found out that many of these overly involved parents don’t even have the permission of their own children to be sharing their photos and info.

Upon further inspection, I noticed that most of the single adults being advertised are in their 20s or 30s with stable careers, good educations and decent salaries. Admittedly, I even saw several single Chinese men who, based on their impressive backgrounds and handsome photos, I wouldn’t mind dating myself. On that note, had I caught my own parents there advertising me and making secret deals with other parents, I would have been mortified.

Inside job: Matchmaker

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The Umbrella Market is a sliver of hope for the desperate parents and grandparents of the city’s singletons.

Source:Global Times Published: A new mobile app for desperate Chinese parents seeking a son-in-law or daughter-in-law claims to offer a digital-age alternative to matchmaking, but according to local users it is no replacement for Shanghai’s real-life “Marriage Market. But according to local media reports, many users do not “like” the new platform, saying it lacks any of the vigilance, and charm, that one may experience when browsing the thousands of ads on display at Shanghai’s Marriage Market, widely attended by indomitable parents, often without the consent of their single offspring.

The biggest complaint users have about the app is the lack of verification during the registration process. No phone numbers or photos are required, which allows the site to be flooded by phonies. For unsuspecting and gullible old-timers unfamiliar with the proliferation of online scams and shams, this leaves them wide open as targets by malicious users. In addition to inauthentic profiles, parents using the app are also forced to label their children like property, describing them strictly according to raw data rather than as unique human beings with a soul.

Some sarcastic netizens call the new app “a virtual vegetable market.

People’s park matchmaking

Parents of unmarried adults flock to [1] the park every Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p. The primary goal of attending the Shanghai marriage market is for parents to find a suitable partner for their child. The standards of finding the right match may be based upon but not limited to age, [1] height, [1] job, [1] income, education, family values, Chinese zodiac sign, [1] and personality.

All of this information is written on a piece of paper, which is then hung upon long strings among other parents’ advertisements for their children. Many parents do not have permission from their child to go to this event. China’s long idealized tradition of continuing their family lineage is very important within Chinese culture.

These missions aim at developing partnerships with stakeholders in targeted markets and pursue opportunities for collaborative business.

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds. Old hand — Liu Jianle is a veteran of the Shanghai marriage market. He has already found a wife for his son. Now, he’s looking for a match for his niece. Hide Caption. Al fresco matchmaking — The marriage market takes place in a shaded park in the center of Shanghai.

The professional — Professional matchmaker Fan Dongfang holds up wedding invitations from couples he successfully paired. Lots of listings — Posters list a man or woman’s height, age, income, education and their hukou – registered hometown. Concerned parents — With young Chinese told from a young age to put education and work before finding love, many struggle to find boyfriends or girlfriends.

Overseas corner — The market has a special place for parents whose children are working overseas. Story highlights Each weekend, parents gather in Shanghai park to find partners for their children Posters list their offspring’s vital statistics — height, age, weight, occupation and income Odds for a successful match, at least for parents with daughters, do not look good. Liu Jianle smiles as he spots a potential suitor for his recently divorced niece among a sea of white personal ads pegged to a board.

Pencil in hand, he jots down the man’s details — 33 years old, 1.

Marriage Market in People’s Park – Shanghai Forum

What do you work as? They come here every weekend, rain or shine, seeking a partner for their grown-up son or daughter. Age, wage, height, education — everyone has a wish list, and they also condense their own child into such a list. In Britain, parents might fret; perhaps say a prayer or two. Then they sit and wait. They sit like fishermen, with collapsible stools and Thermos flasks to keep them going for an eight-hour shift.

Cities like Beijing, Shanghai, ShenZhen, and Wuhan play host to this progressively popular free matchmaking platform, specifically catered to parents aid their.

Walk into the famous People’s Park in People’s Square on Metro Line 2 — the heart of Shanghai City — on any weekend between 12 pm and 5 pm, and you will see something strange — a huge gathering of people which is the bustling Marriage Market. At first glance of this crowd, the author thought it to be some real-estate brokering day event of sorts, but realized this to be more on the lines of a marriage brokering weekly event where desperate parents and grandparents are milling about, looking for a mate for their unmarried offspring.

It may sound quite crude, but actually this is traditional and a regular activity for the middle aged and the elderly folks. China Highlights was curious to know more about what exactly goes on there. We found that most of the folks there were anxious mothers, fathers, uncles, aunts and even grandparents looking for a good match for their sons and daughters of marriageable age which is open to debate.

We have to warn you that this section of the park can get very crowded at this time. But it is a one of a kind experience that fascinates you as you walk through scores of pamphlets snapshot biographies lining up the pathways and animated parents and grandparents involved in heated discussions and ‘brokering’ marriage deals, wondering what special qualities of the brides and grooms are being advertised.

People line up here, sitting on the ground with biographies stuck on umbrellas making it their private stalls , discussing futures of young people, who, in all probability, are not too happy with this arrangement. We didn’t really see any eager-to-be bride or groom and suspect the enthusiasm is fueled purely by the parents. The pamphlet biographies include details such as birthdays, height, weight, hobbies, job of the candidates and figures that seemed like monthly incomes of the candidates.

China’s ‘marriage market’ where mom sets you up on your first date

Have you ever heard of something called marriage market? When I read about it in the guides for Shanghai, I was simply amazed. But apparently I was wrong.

Shanghai-marriage-market2. Exclusive matchmaking in Europe and the US generally follows the same trends. It’s the cosmopolitan dating.

Many people in China who want to get married are having trouble finding a partner. The country’s decades-long one-child policy led to the country having more young men than women, and their growing prosperity is making them pickier. The fate of eight young men will be decided today inside a cool, neon-lit shopping centre in Hangzhou, its facade emblazoned with a sign for “Intimate City”.

On their first day of the course, the men fan out in different directions, wearing ironed shirts and gelled hair. Some hook their thumbs into the loops of their jeans, strutting around like peacocks as they try to impress women. Dr Love, their coach at the seminar on flirting, taught them how. Yang Jing, left, searches for potential candidates to add to the database of Diamond Love, a matchmaking service.

Gilles Sabrie. One of the men is Liu Yuqiang, who works at a Chinese supermarket. He wanders the shiny corridors, wearing wiry glasses, a jacket and polished shoes, all intended to hide the fact that he comes from a village of only 80 families. A man from a rural area would be out of the question as husband material for China’s attractive urban women, that much Liu knows.

Besides, he’s 27, fairly old to be single here.

The traditional Tinder: Why matchmaking families flock to Shanghai’s Marriage Market

The EC2i partnership is to conduct 4 matchmaking missions over the 2 years of the project , two in the United States, two in China. These missions aim at developing partnerships with stakeholders in targeted markets and pursue opportunities for collaborative business development for European SMEs. EC2i partners work towards securing strong partnerships with Chinese stakeholders.

Marriage markets are not unique to Beijing. The largest and most famous is located in People’s Park in Shanghai, and others exist in many.

In China, women are often still seen as a commodity, a product that begins to lose value after turning 24, the average age of marriages there. She has been living in Shanghai for several years, and here, as in many other big cities, women who are well-educated and earn good salaries can have a hard time finding somebody. Out of this social climate, a multimillion-dollar industry has emerged that exploits the fears and loneliness of a generation.

Eric, the president of the Weime Club, has been teaching classes like this for more than 10 years. At first, they focused exclusively on male clients, but they have been shifting toward a female audience. At the end of the afternoon he chooses two students to take for hands-on training. The students were told to pretend they had run out of battery life on their phones and to approach men, asking for a photograph. Over the last few years, more and more such companies have cropped up in the ever-expanding Chinese cities.

Diamond Love, a matchmaking agency in Shanghai, caters to extremely rich clients.

Matchmaking Market in Shanghai